The latest Scam Trends from Amazon: Alerts about fake orders are #1 scam for fourth straight month

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Each month, Amazon updates consumers with the latest information on the top scams to watch out for. Continue to check this page for updates and to view our previous alerts.

Did you receive an alert asking for verification of a purchase you don’t remember making? Beware of this common scam. For the fourth straight month, the most frequently reported scam involves a made-up issue with your order. These messages use a false sense of urgency to try to get your credit card information to verify or dispute an order you never placed.

Here are some important tips to identify scams and stay safe:

1. Be wary of false urgency. Scammers may try to create a sense of urgency to persuade you to do what they’re asking. Be wary any time someone tries to convince you that you must act now.

2. For any questions related to an order, always check your order history on Amazon.com or via the “Amazon Shopping” app. Only legitimate purchases will appear in your order history.

3. Do not click on any links or provide your information without authenticating the email or verifying the link. Visit the Message Center which displays a log of authentic communications sent from Amazon.


Published April 30, 2024

Alerts about fake orders are #1 scam

Were you surprised to receive an alert about a purchase on Amazon that you never made? The message wasn’t really from Amazon.

Be aware of a rise in scams involving fake purchases, where scammers claim that there is a shipping issue with your order. These messages are most often sent over email, and state that a payment is required – most often by credit card – to fix the issue with your order.

Here are some important tips to identify scams and stay safe:

1. For any questions related to an order, always check your order history on Amazon.com or via the “Amazon Shopping” app. Only legitimate purchases will appear in your order history.

2. Do not click on any links or provide your information without authenticating the email or verifying the link. Visit the Message Center which displays a log of authentic communications sent from Amazon.


Published March 28, 2024

A rise in membership renewal scams

Do you have a membership or subscription to an online service? Be aware of a rise in “Membership Renewal Scams,” where bad actors pose as legitimate companies and request you to renew by giving your credit card information.

Here are some important tips to identify scams and stay safe:

1. Don’t pay unless it is through the company’s app or website.

Always use the company’s mobile app or website to make a payment or make changes to your membership or subscription.

2. Be wary of false urgency.

Scammers may try to create a sense of urgency to persuade you to do what they’re asking. Be wary any time someone tries to convince you that you must act now.

To learn more about Amazon’s approach to protecting consumers from impersonation scams, visit our Scam Prevention page here.


Published March 19, 2024

Of all Amazon impersonation scams reported by our customers globally in 2023, over two-thirds of scams were related to order issues or account issues and both were reported in 20+ countries.

Order Issues

These scams are unsolicited phone calls, text messages, or emails containing details about a purchase you never made, asking you to confirm or deny the purchase and provide account information to the scammer.

Account Issues

These scams involve fake billing issues, and may refer to unauthorized account access, often threatening account suspension unless the fake issue is resolved urgently.

Here are some important tips to identify scams and keep your account and information safe:

  1. Trust Amazon-owned channels.
    Always go through the Amazon mobile app or website when seeking customer service, tech support, or when looking to make changes to your account.
  2. Be wary of false urgency.
    Scammers may try to create a sense of urgency to persuade you to do what they’re asking. Be wary any time someone tries to convince you that you must act now.
  3. Never pay over the phone.
    Amazon will never ask you to provide payment information, including gift cards (or “verification cards,” as some scammers call them) for products or services over the phone.
  4. Verify links first.
    Review the link for misspellings or repeated characters. Legitimate Amazon websites contain “amazon.com”. Go directly to our website when seeking help with Amazon devices/services, orders or to make changes to your account.
  5. Verify email senders.
    Review email senders before clicking on email attachments. Legitimate Amazon emails contain “@amazon.com.” In your web browser, hover over the display name under “From” to see full sender address. Look for misspellings or added or substituted characters. Visit the Message Center to view authentic messages from Amazon.

To learn more about Amazon’s approach to protecting consumers from impersonation scams, visit our Scam Prevention page here.